A series of announcements over the last two weeks have shown the Abe administration’s true plan for Fukushima & Japan. As the political class pushes for reactor restarts, their commitment towards Fukushima has turned to outright betrayal. …read moreRead More


PART 2: “NUCLEAR: IT ISN’T CLEAN, GREEN OR RENEWABLE” CHICAGO– [NOTE: With the Illinois Legislative session scheduled to end May 31st, and the Legislature soon to vote on the future direction of Illinois energy services, NEIS is initiating a series of releases over the next few weeks designed to address some of the myths, misconceptions, … Continue reading THE COUNTDOWN ON ILLINOIS’ ENERGY FUTURE CONTINUES! …read moreRead More


via Enformable.com / May 19, 2015 / Tokyo Electric Power Company has not used any uranium to produce electricity since the March 11th, 2011 nuclear disaster. None of the reactors owned by TEPCO have been restarted and remain offline. The utility has been struggling to stay ahead of the mounting financial problems as it has to decommission the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and pay compensation for damages without generating … Continue reading …read moreRead More


by Keisuke Sato / The Asahi Shimbun / May 19, 2015 / Nearly 70 percent of evacuees from areas around the damaged Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant have family members complaining of physical or mental problems, a recent survey showed. Released by the Fukushima prefectural government, the survey covering fiscal 2014 revealed that 66.3 percent of households that fled the disaster area–after the nuclear crisis triggered by the March 2011 … Continue reading …read moreRead More


TEPCO to sell large portion of uranium reserves"> Thumbnail for 325763

Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the utility that owns and operated the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, has not used any uranium to produce electricity since the March 11th, 2011 nuclear disaster. None of the reactors owned by TEPCO have been restarted and remain offline.

The utility has been struggling to stay ahead of the mounting financial problems as it has to decommission the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and pay compensation for damages without generating income from its other nuclear reactors. Without the 9 trillion yen of aid promised by the Japanese government, TEPCO would’ve collapsed shortly after the onset of the nuclear disaster.

TEPCO has been pushing to restart its only remaining operational plant, Kashiwazaki-Kariwa, in 2016, but has faced many complications and local opposition to restarts.

According to a spokesman for TEPCO, in a last ditch effort, the utility is negotiating a sale of part of its uranium reserves with the suppliers.

TEPCO holds some 17,570 tons of uranium, which would provide enough fuel to operate the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa plant for 10 years. According to estimates released by the utility, by selling half of its reserves it could raise $102 million.

The post TEPCO to sell large portion of uranium reserves appeared first on Enformable.

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Battleground Jaitapur: beyond the BJP-Shiv Sena tug-of-war"> Thumbnail for 325595

The local communities are resolute to fight and they consider the current situation as just a phase in the struggle when hopes are pinned down on the BJP-Siv Sena strife and the declining fate of Areva. The people of Jaitapur would continue to fight, while the leadership, strategies and dynamics might keep changing. The real energy and imperative for the Jaitapur comes from below. …read moreRead More


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Scott Sklar, former head of the Solar Electric Industries Association and now the principal of The Stella Group, is one of America’s most knowledgeable and outspoken proponents of solar power, and has been for decades. In this piece, first posted (but with a somewhat garbled ending) on RenewableEnergyWorld.com, he takes on the false notion that everyone pays the same rates for electricity. We don’t. And that makes a difference when there are nuclear and fossil fuel utilities arguing that people without solar power are somehow subsidizing those who do have it. They don’t.

Many electric utilities are flexing their political muscles against solar net metering and state renewable portfolio standards (RPS). Their main issue is that other consumers are subsidizing solar (and renewables), particularly pointing to lower-income consumers. I have already written about the numerous studies that disprove those allegations, but that is not what this article is about.

There are several fantasies about electricity rates, and it is time to address “ratepayers subsidizing solar.” The corollary is “at no other time do ratepayers subsidize other ratepayers.” I am here to tell you, dear readers, that this belief is hogwash. Cross-ratepayer subsidies occur every single day in every utility service territory.

Fantasy One: There Is One Electric Rate

In many states, residential ratepayers have one homogenized rate, and commercial/industrial/institutional (CII) ratepayers have a series of electric sub-rates called demand charges (rates increase over a certain level of electric use), peak and season rates, and in deregulated states “spot” or “ratchet” rates (which are time-specific rates) and some even have time-of-use (TOU) rates. So in states where residential customers have a singular rate, those CII ratepayers subsidize residential rates.

Fantasy Two: There Are No Cross-rate Subsidies

Every utility in their service area allows large industrial, commercial, and institutional customers to receive lower electric rates. In fact, these large players negotiate with the electric utility on what rate they expect when they move a facility or building into an area. The larger they are, the lower electric rates they get.

According to the Energy Information Administration, 2014 electric utility rates for New England stand at 17.98/kWh for residential while commercial is 14.04/kWh and industrial is 10.97/kWh, which is the only electric rate that went down from the year prior. Pacific coast rates are at 13.81/kWh for residential and 8.51/kWh for industrial, while West South Central states are at 11.01/kWh for residential, 8.17/kWh for commercial and 5.75/kWh for industrial.

In fact there is a whole industry of consultants that represent companies to negotiate lower electric rates with their electric utilities. One such consultant advertises: “Our energy consultants routinely negotiate with utilities to generate savings for companies. These negotiations extend beyond tariff rates into other utility opportunities, incentives and programs that involve: obtaining preferable contract terms and developing specialized rates.”

Manuals for officials from commercial and industry that move or open new facilities routinely state: “Electricity price negotiations: In contrast to negotiating your interconnection agreement, you may have more bargaining flexibility in negotiating your price for electricity. In …read moreRead More