[soundcloud url="https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/312397351?secret_token=s-Cnmyr" params="color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&wmode=opaque" width="100%" height="166" iframe="true" /]

Fairewinds Chief Engineer Arnie Gundersen joined Sojourner Truth Radio‘s host Margaret Prescod on March 14th to commemorate the 6th anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Joining Arnie on the show, is Kevin Kamps of Beyond Nuclear, a radioactive waste watchdog. Kevin discusses the impact Fukushima has had on the United States and the Pacific Ocean. Arnie shares insight from his recent trip to Japan about the conditions, government cover ups, and ongoing radioactivity.

Arnie appears around the 9 minute mark.

…read moreRead More


Today, we observe the 6th anniversary of the ongoing nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan. Six years after what is arguably the world’s worst nuclear disaster, one which was avoidable even under the extraordinary conditions of the massive earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011, Japan’s destroyed reactors continue to … Continue reading On the 6th Anniversary of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Water IS Life: Stop Polluting the Pacific Ocean! …read moreRead More


Yuji Suzuki, a 56-year old employee of the Japanese Ministry of the Environment in Fukushima Prefecture in charge of overseeing decontamination activities after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was arrested on charges of alleged bribery along with the former president of the construction firm that provided the bribe.

It has been reported that Suzuki received transportation, accommodations, meals and entertainment at fancy restaurants and seedy nightclubs, racking up a bill of several hundred thousand yen.

The federal funding for decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture has turned into a good way for companies to cash in on the nuclear disaster. Mikio Kosugi, the former president of the Toyama Prefecture construction company hoped that the bribe would help him win more contracts and funding from the government.

The Japanese Ministry of the Environment has admitted that the scandal could corrode public trust in the decontamination efforts, but that the agency will try to win back the trust of the nation.

Source: NHK

Source: Kyodo

…read moreRead More