By Michael Mariotte

I have been in this job at NIRS for 25 years (03-03-1991—now). I can hear: “Mary, 50 women is not a meaningful sample size!” (I reply: Correct; for a study).

And: “Those women you met at Mama Tea Parties are self-selected activists—so they are a completely biased sample!” (Me: Correct, but this is not a study; these women are not a sample, they are leaders! They are Representatives with a capitol “R”!)

Worst: “Mary, you are simply servicing the ‘official’ government line! All of the symptoms you described could have any cause; these women are ‘just’ suffering anxiety and stress, and therefore they link their problems to radiation. There is no basis. These are ‘just’ women who are afraid of radiation; It is ALL IN THEIR HEADS!”

I hope anyone who shares those thoughts are back with me today. Please consider the points I have brought to Japan on gender and harm from ionizing radiation.

I turn now to statistically significant findings ionizing radiation, cancer and gender.

I first spoke on disproportionate harm to females at the Global Conference on the Humanitarian Impacts of Nuclear Weapons in Vienna (2014), then at the United Nations (May, 2015). I am finally here, speaking in Japan. These findings are rooted here, in the atomic ashes of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Since my work is extremely visual, I encourage you to also visit the slides of my presentation.

Click here for a version of slides with accompanying text. Click here for a version without text but larger slides.

Read my original 2011 paper “Atomic Radiation is More Harmful to Women” LINK:

Or watch the 5 minute video created for Gender Day at the Climate Talks in Paris (2015).

KEY POINTS FROM MY TALKS:

Gender in the Lifespan data (The National Academies of Science published the data in the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation “BEIR VII” in 2005; here is NIRS’ press release upon its publication.) from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-Bomb Survivors has been analyzed by three separate authors, each making these findings:

*Those exposed as infants and young children got the most cancer at some point in their lives;
* For every boy who eventually got cancer, two girls eventually got cancer (see slide 1 of my presentation);
* This is cancer across the lifetime, not only in childhood.
*There is a gender difference across the entire lifetime (see slide 2)
*Among those who were adults: for every two men who died of cancer, three women died (see slide 3).

I draw these further points:
• Why is gender a factor in cancer from radiation? Today, we do not know. Dr. Rosalie Bertell suggested that a greater concentration of reproductive tissue in the female body could be the cause (see slide 4). We do not yet know.
• We must not wait! Now we know there is greater harm to the young, particularly females, we must act to protect and prevent exposures now.
• Decision-makers only see information based on the Reference Man (adult male).
• Radiation regulations and standards are all based on …read more

Read more here:: http://safeenergy.org/2016/03/07/japan-diary-2016-fukushima5-part-4/