Former Tokyo Electric Power Co. President Masataka Shimizu (Asahi Shimbun file photo)

Originally published in The Asahi Shimbun on December 27, 2017 Written by Kohei Kano

Former Tokyo Electric Power Co. President Masataka Shimizu (Asahi Shimbun file photo)

NIIGATA–An investigation committee is leveling the blame for the failure to use the word “meltdown” following the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011 at Tokyo Electric Power Co. President Masataka Shimizu.

Shimizu instructed TEPCO employees not to use the term on his own and was not following orders from the prime minister’s office, the committee’s report said on Dec. 26.

TEPCO did not publicly confirm that a meltdown had occurred until May 2011.

“There were no instructions (to TEPCO) from the prime minister’s office on whether to use the word ‘meltdown’ or not,” the panel said as to why the announcement was delayed for two months.

The committee was jointly set up by the Niigata prefectural government and TEPCO to investigate the cause of the accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant due to the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011.

The investigation is a prerequisite for the prefectural government starting discussions on whether to agree to the restart of the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant, also operated by TEPCO, in the prefecture.

The description of the investigation committee’s report contrasted sharply with a report released in June 2016 by a third-party investigation committee set up by TEPCO.

According to the third-party committee’s report, Shimizu instructed then Vice President Sakae Muto through a TEPCO employee “not to use the word ‘meltdown’ at the direction of the prime minister’s office” when Muto held a news conference on March 14, 2011, three days after the nuclear accident ensued.

As Shimizu’s memory had faded, the third-party committee was unable to confirm details of the “instruction” from the prime minister’s office, but assumed that there was a directive from the prime minister’s office.

Whether an order had been issued by the prime minister’s office became a focus of the investigation of the Niigata …read moreRead More


Radiation-contaminated debris and soil is stockpiled for disposal near the Tokyo Electric Power Company's embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 25, 2016, in Okuma, Japan. (Photo: Christopher Furlong / Getty Images)

Radiation-contaminated debris and soil is stockpiled for disposal near the Tokyo Electric Power Company’s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 25, 2016, in Okuma, Japan. (Photo: Christopher Furlong / Getty Images)

By Darh Jamail Originally Published In Truthout 7/17/2017

Former nuclear industry senior vice president Arnie Gundersen, who managed and coordinated projects at 70 US atomic power plants, is appalled at how the Japanese government is handling the Fukushima nuclear crisis.

“The inhumanity of the Japanese government toward the Fukushima disaster refugees is appalling,” Gundersen, a licensed reactor operator with 45 years of nuclear power engineering experience and the author of a bestselling book in Japan about the Fukushima Daiichi disaster, told Truthout.

To see more stories like this, visit “Planet or Profit?”

He explains that both the Japanese government and the atomic power industry are trying to force almost all of the people who evacuated their homes in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster to return “home” before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

This March Japan’s federal government announced the subsidies that have, up until now, been provided to Fukushima evacuees who were mandated to leave their homes are being withdrawn, which will force many of them to return to their contaminated prefecture out of financial necessity.

And it’s not just the Japanese government. The International Olympic Commission is working overtime to normalize the situation as well, even though conditions at Fukushima are anything but normal. The commission even has plans for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics to have baseball and softball games played at Fukushima.

Gundersen believes these developments are happening so that the pro-nuclear Japanese government can claim the Fukushima disaster is “over.” However, he noted, “The disaster is not ‘over’ and ‘home’ no longer is habitable.”

His analysis of what is happening is simple.

“Big banks and large electric utilities and energy companies are putting profit …read moreRead More


National Alliance of Anti-Nuclear Movements welcomes the Report submitted to the Parliament of India by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG). It raises some extremely serious questions about functioning of the nuclear establishment in India which the government and citizens can ignore only at their peril.

The post ‘CAG Report on Kudankulam is a Warning Bell for Nuclear Safety and Accountability in India’: NAAM Statement appeared first on DiaNuke.org.

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Earlier this month, President Trump announced that he wants the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to “lead an innovative space exploration program to send American astronauts back to the moon, and eventually Mars.” But while couched in patriotic sound bites and pioneering rhetoric that “Florida and America will lead the way into the stars,” the risks such ventures would entail — and the hidden agenda they conceal — have scarcely been touched upon

The post Nuking Outer Space: Why Trump’s NASA Plans Are Disaster In Making appeared first on DiaNuke.org.

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We are republishing Joe Cirincione’s article from DefenseOne, in which he mentions 5 major nuclear threats that the world faced in 2017, and they will continue to trouble us in 2018.

The post Joe Cirincione Lists 5 Biggest Nuclear Threats in 2017 Which Will Haunt in 2018. America Is The Biggest Of Them appeared first on DiaNuke.org.

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